43 – reviewing Sheryl Sandberg’s “Lean In”

Moved to my new website: Views & Reviews by Lisa C Hannon.

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3 thoughts on “43 – reviewing Sheryl Sandberg’s “Lean In”

  1. I SO totally agree. I don’t want to pay the price it would take to be a C-level. Probably a lot of the other executive-level positions, either. As with you, my first thought was the model of Angie’s List. Collaborative, community based, giving others power over their own lives is a more female-centered point of view. And while in our 20s my husband aspired to be a VP by age 35 and he’s a sr. manager now (and well past 35), I don’t see him wanting to play in that arena anymore. His employees love him, as he treats them as people rather than “resources,” but that attitude doesn’t always go over well with his Directors and VPs.

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    1. Thanks, Cindy – always nice to get confirmation of your ideas. I’m really intrigued by your info on your husband’s style of management. I struggle in a world that is based on male power concepts–are there as many males that struggle with it as well? My point being, instead of killing ourselves to become equal in a system that wasn’t created for or by women, perhaps equality is them being more like US. It’s already been proved that more women on corporate boards means increased profits.

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  2. His situation might be unique, I don’t know. I do know that over the years I’ve noticed that the normal male/female roles in our relationship are not quite the norm – I assume some of the traditionally male roles, and he the female ones. Some of that has to do with the fact that he’s legally blind. He’s pretty bad at reading visual cues. At work I think he tries to make up for that by being a more collaborative leader. He’s always been the one to bring a straggler home from work for dinner. I can’t tell you how much Amway we’ve bought from his employees (or their spouses) who are trying to make a few extra bucks on the side. At work, when there’s an OMG moment, he always defends his employees when they’re blamed for the screw up. (Unless they’re the ones that actually screwed up, of course.)

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